Talk To Frank resources-for-family

What Is Talk To Frank?

The campaign against drugs that has the longest duration in the entire UK is Talk to Frank. But, have people quit drug abuse through this?

The drug education in the entire UK received a total turn around ten years back when the police Swat team ran into a rural kitchen somewhere in the UK. Cautions of how drugs could cause you to become disturbed and impassioned calls to say no to the menacing pushers skulking in every single playground disappeared. A lighter, more humorous approach was used instead.


In the first ad, a mother suggests to her teenage son that they have a chat about drugs so he calls the police snatch squad. The message delivered by the advert had not been heard before either "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Devised by the advertising agency, Mother, Frank was actually the National Drugs Helpline brand new name. It was intended to be a put stock in "elder brother" assumes that youngsters could swing to for advice concerning illegal substances. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.


According to the creative director, Justin Tindall, of the advertising agency, Leo Burnett, it was important that Frank was at no time seen in the flesh so that he could never be the victim of ridicule for wearing the incorrect shoes or attempting to be "down with the kids". Even the sham Frank videos on YouTube are moderately deferential. One more thing that distinguishes Frank from other government-funded campaigns is that nothing links the ad to the government in anyway whatsoever.

Drugs instruction has progressed significantly since Nancy Reagan, and in the UK, the cast of Grange Hill asked adolescents to "Simply Say No" to drugs, a movement which numerous specialists now considers was counterproductive.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. There are still images of prison cells and hurt parents being presented in countries that have strong penalties for drugs possession. You play, you pay is a campaign that was launched in Singapore recently.

In the United States of America, the federal government has spent millions of dollars on a long-running campaign, Above the Influence, that sells positive possibilities to using substances by making use of a combination of funny and cautionary stories. In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. Though, an unexpected number of anti-drug campaigns all over the globe still resort back to strategies intended to arouse fear or alarm, specifically the substance-fuelled plunge to hell. A classic illustration is a current Canadian business, part of the DrugsNot4Me arrangement, which demonstrates an appealing, sure young lady's change into a shuddering and hollow eyed smash-up on account of "drugs."

Inquire about into a UK anti-drugs movements in the vicinity of 1999 and 2004 proposes promotions demonstrating the antagonistic impacts of medication mishandle can regularly empower youngsters "on the edges of society" to explore different avenues regarding drugs.


Frank broke new ground and was abundantly critiqued by opposed Conservative politicians at the while for setting out to propose that drugs may offer highs in addition to lows.


An early ad posted online told viewers, "Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world."

Understanding the true information behind the message was very difficult. The man in arrears the cocaine advertisement, Matt Powell, then creative director of digital agency Profero, now disbelieves he overvalued the focus span of the ordinary web browser. Some might not have adhered around to the finish of the liveliness to get some answers concerning the negative impacts. Establishing the integrity of the Frank brand by telling the youth the truth about drugs and their effects was the ultimate aim of the ad, Powell states.

The Home Office says 67% of youngsters in a study said they would swing to Frank in the event that they required drug guidance. A total of 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and a total of 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. For him, this shows that the campaign is very successful.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

Drug usage in the UK has gone around 9% in the decade since the conflict propelled, yet specialists say quite a bit of this is down to a decrease in cannabis utilization, potentially connected to changing states of mind towards smoking tobacco among youngsters.


What Is Frank?

FRANK was launched in 2003 as a collaborated effort of the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government as a national drug education service. It's supposed to reduce the use of illegal and legal substances by teaching teens about the possible effects of alcohol and drugs. Several media campaigns on the web and on radio have been put out by this programme.


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Services

FRANK offers the following services for those who are looking for info and/or guidance regarding drugs

  • A dedicated website
  • A private phone number, accessible 24 hours a day
  • Email
  • A classified live chat facility, accessible from 2pm-6pm everyday
  • A service to help find appropriate counselling or treatment